I am fortunate to be able to have my tiny house on a farm in the country.  It gives me a beautiful place to live, and allows me to help out on the farm.  I suppose I consider myself farm help, and there is always plenty to do on a farm.

The planning for where to put my tiny house, and how to situate the house, began well over a year ago.  In the end, we cut a driveway through, placed gravel, and put a “pad” for the house to sit on.  I chose a compost toilet, so I use only a grey water system.  We dug a dry well, and hooked my grey water to that.  So my kitchen sink water and my shower water drain into the dry well, and I am careful to use only biodegradable soaps and detergents.

I will say that I am very pleased that the well water on the property is the best!  It always cold (about 56 degrees), and truly delicious.  The water filter I had used in Tennessee, I gave away because I have no need for it here on the farm.

Putting the "pad" for the tiny house in place.

Putting the “pad” for the tiny house in place.

Completing the pad to meet with the driveway.

Completing the pad to meet with the driveway.

 

Filling the dry well with a series of boulders, smaller rocks, then gravel before covering.

Filling the dry well with a series of boulders, smaller rocks, then gravel before covering.

 

The house arrives 2 days later, shipped from Colorado Springs, CO.

The house arrives 2 days later, shipped from Colorado Springs, CO.

 

Backing around the sharpe corner to the "pad".

Backing around the sharpe corner to the “pad”.

 

First picture in the new home location.

First picture in the new home location.

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5 Comments

  1. Ouida Guinn

    August 5, 2016 at 3:36 pm

    Loved looking at your pictures and all you commentary. An adventure, for sure.

    1. d4deli@me.com

      August 5, 2016 at 3:59 pm

      Thanks for visiting Ouida. I plan to keep this blog up and running for awhile, sharing tales along the way. It is a journey, and so far, it has been a perfect fit for me.

  2. Brad Jamieson

    August 5, 2016 at 5:21 pm

    I was going to suggest jack stands to increase stability and tire covers to prevent tire rot but from the pictures I see you have that all covered .

    1. d4deli@me.com

      August 5, 2016 at 5:30 pm

      Jack stands, yes. The house comes with stabilizing stands attached to all four corners of the trailer, but they are not intended to hold the weight of the house, which is 1900 lbs dry weight. The tires are off the ground and spin, and then they are covered with the wheel covers to keep them from weathering. The deck will soon have an awning over it, which will afford even more protection to one side at least. That will serve as my mud room in the winter months. We get a lot of rain in Oregon.

  3. Brad Jamieson

    August 5, 2016 at 5:52 pm

    I saw the deck, it is great. Would suggest jack stands built for heavy vehicles. One in each corner and, perhaps, one in the middle on each side. This would prevent shaking and rocking.

    How far are you from Portland?

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